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US CB S. Gigantea Protects?

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by bryverine, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. bryverine

    bryverine Arachnoangel

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    Has anyone heard of anyone trying to breed these in the US?

    I know the centipede portion of the hobby is rather non-existent compared to Ts in the US except for perhaps subsipinipes...

    Thanks for any info!
     
  2. centipeedle

    centipeedle Arachnosquire

    From what I’ve heard gigantea is extremely hard to breed. And I agree that in the U.S it is very hard to find centipedes for sale besides subspinipes.
     
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  3. bryverine

    bryverine Arachnoangel

    I read that the babies often eat mom too - which to me (especially at $500) would be a terrible thing to witness...
     
  4. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I had one that had 156 babies(galapos) so them eating the mother is really nothing to worry about imo. 150 or so, and lose one, no big deal. Breeding isn't really that hard, it's just that there aren't many pedes around to do it. If somebody has a male galapagoensis btw, I have two females, you'd get half the babies, or more, I just want to keep enough to try it again later. I made the mistake of getting rid of too many males so now I'm stuck at a dead end. Yeah I many try the classifieds.
     
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  5. Scoly

    Scoly Arachnoknight

    I believe CH_Lee is pairing white legs at the moment.
     
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  6. bryverine

    bryverine Arachnoangel

    What's the "turn around time" between breeding and peedling? I'm sure it varies, but on average?
     
  7. Scoly

    Scoly Arachnoknight

    I haven't successfully bred centipedes so can't answer, but it can be quite long. Centipedes will hold off until conditions are optimal, so gestation is a highly variable factor. From laying eggs to getting nymphs you're talking a good few weeks for most species.
     
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  8. LeFanDesBugs

    LeFanDesBugs Arachnobaron

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    Egg development is very long -- my S.subspinipes laid on the 11th of november, and the pedelings are still white! They haven't colored up yet..
    Gestation can be quite long, I'd say a few months. But it's hard to determine its true duration as centipedes can store sperm, choosing when to start the gestation. That renders the mating date meaningless.
    @Scoly , wanna talk over the phone? I'm bored af xD
     
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  9. Scoly

    Scoly Arachnoknight

    No phone calls tonight, got a project deadline, which is why I'm on AB :D
     
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  10. LeFanDesBugs

    LeFanDesBugs Arachnobaron

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    Hahaha ok. Tell me when you feel like it. Anytime. :)
     
  11. LawnShrimp

    LawnShrimp Arachnoangel

    It's not that they are hard to breed - gigantea are fairly calm around conspecifics from videos I've seen. It's just that adults are rare, and most people don't have the money to get a large amount of adults necessary for a large-scale CB project. There aren't even that many pictures of baby SA centipedes in contrast to other species which are more commonly bred.
    Not totally sure for gigantea but females will gestate eggs for a long time. Centipedes also seem to lay at the same time of year (my two female hainanum egged up within two weeks of each other last September) as other individuals of the same species, so a female mated at a certain time might wait until the right time of year to lay. From egg to juvenile-color pedeling is about 2.5-3 months for most species. Gigantea might take longer or shorter as they go through a matriphagy phase which might mean they have an extra life stage to go through or alternately get a growth spurt from their huge first meals.
     
  12. BobBarley

    BobBarley Arachnoprince

    Yes, there is at least one person with 7+ specimens of the "white legged" specimens in the US, who has had at least 1 successful mating (I'm pretty sure way more than 1).

    @Ratmosphere used to (?) have a male galap. Perhaps you can track down who has it now through him.
     
  13. bryverine

    bryverine Arachnoangel

    How come nobody told me I messed up the thread title!?! :eek:
     
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  14. CHLee

    CHLee Arachnoknight

    Which video did you see that they were calm?
     
  15. Kookookachu

    Kookookachu Arachnopeon

    There is a guy named Mike on Instagram, based in AZ, who recently was selling numerous sub-adult S. gigantea (white leg variant) for between $350-$425 (incl. Next day LAG). I believe he goes by Mastigoproctus on this site. On Instagram, his channel is called mikes_house_of_a_thousand_leg. He often has exotic scolopendra pedes available, however, he's rather pricey. Also if you check out the various centipede/invert groups on Facebook you can network with innumerable trustworthy hobbyists.
     
  16. LawnShrimp

    LawnShrimp Arachnoangel

    I didn't exactly mean 'calm', more like 'not aggressive'. In most videos I've seen including yours, Michael Dixon's and a few others on YouTube, the gigantea never seem too eager to kill each other even if they are skittish and moving around.
     
  17. CHLee

    CHLee Arachnoknight

    That’s because no one ever bothered to record from the beginning when they were just introduced together
     
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  18. Staehilomyces

    Staehilomyces Arachnoprince Active Member

    Mike gets in some really nice pedes, but like others have said, he is quite pricey, selling common yellow-legged dehaani for about $50-75.
     
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  19. LeFanDesBugs

    LeFanDesBugs Arachnobaron

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    @CHLee , speaking of breeding, congrats on pairing the jewels. That's so cool..
     
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